Category Archives: Government

Without a Passed Bill This Week, Chicago Must Announce School Closings by Saturday

No matter where you live in Illinois, your legislators will hear from Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel this week. Emanuel’s Chicago Public Schools desperately wants a change in state law so it will have until March to decide which of up to 120 schools it will close as it struggles to balance its budget. If lawmakers don’t pass a bill this week, the district will have to announce all closure plans by Saturday

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Illinois is marching to the edge of its own financial cliff

Illinois is marching to the edge of its own financial cliff by failing to control its ever-growing pension costs, says the leader of the Illinois Chamber of Commerce. When the market collapsed in 2008, so did the bottom lines of the state’s pensions. “While the nation went through the worst recession in modern history, Illinois’ public pension funds still were projecting healthy returns with their heads firmly in the sand,” writes Doug Whitley. http://bit.ly/STkLId
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Illinois General Assembly Described as “Death Grip”

“Democrat controlled” doesn’t quite describe the Illinois General Assembly these days. “For the next two years, that might have to be changed to Democrat death grip,” says longtime Statehouse reporter Doug Finke. But the legislative Dems “aren’t a monolithic bunch,” so don’t expect two years peace and harmony among them, Finke adds.

 

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Peoria Journal Star Joins Ranks of Opposition Amendment

 

Add the Peoria Journal Star to the growing list of voices opposed to the constitutional amendment proposal on next week’s election ballot. The paper calls it “nothing more than a charade disguised as reform, pretending to be the solution it isn’t.” Even worse: “The full text of the abysmally written and probably purposely indecipherable amendment – leave it to the lawyers – will not appear on the ballot, so this is the equivalent of signing a contract you haven’t read.”

Wall Street Journal Dissects Illinois’ “Double Helix” Situation

The Wall Street Journal editorial page sure knows how to turn a phrase. On the cause of Illinois’ wretched financial situation, the WSJ blames “the double helix of government unions and Democratic politicians.” It may not be quite that simple, but who can’t appreciate a phrase that catchy?

 

Reboot Illinois’ Pension Amendment Guide

Been wondering about how to cut through all the noise and debate over the pension amendment? Here’s Reboot’s handy infographic on the ballot question…

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Opposition to the Illinois Pension Amendment Forming Unlikely Partners

You don’t often see the conservative Illinois Policy Institute, the Illinois Green Party and the state’s largest employee union united for a cause. But when the cause is a constitutional amendment that may or may not have an effect on the state’s disastrous pension situation, their hands are joined in opposition. Derided last spring as an empty and meaningless gesture by the General Assembly, Constitutional Amendment 49 suddenly has become controversial.

What’s In The Water: Why Is Illinois So Corrupt

Illinois Lawmakers Stipends

For Illinois lawmakers, leadership stipends can add as much as 40 percent to a legislator’s base salary of $64,717 for what is considered a part-time job. Nearly three-quarters of the General Assembly received leadership stipends ranging from $1,600 to $26,000 for holding a committee or party leadership position. Illinois Comptroller’s Office, cited by the Daily Herald.

Chicago Papers to Voters: Don’t Be Chumps

The Chicago Tribune editorial board  says anyone who votes for the pension amendment on the Nov. 6 ballot is a chump. “Don’t be a chump,” says the Trib. It adds that what we really need is a constitutional amendment that gives lawmakers some guidelines for what can and can’t be done to fix the pension disaster Illinois faces. Rival The Chicago Sun-Times agrees: “Voters should say no to the constitutional amendment and send the message that Illinois residents want real pension reform, not potentially harmful window dressing.”

 

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